crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

The first Crossed Genres Quarterly is now available for sale! More than 75,000 words, this issue collects the previous 3 web issues of Crossed Genres, as well as 3 exclusive stories, 1 nonfiction piece and 1 interview.

Authors featured: Jacob Edwards, Arthur Carey, Jaymee Goh, Nicole Givens Kurtz, Christie Yant, Zen Cho, Angela Rega, Andrew S. Fuller, Lindsey Duncan, Shelly Li, Ken Liu, Molly Tanzer, Richard Larsen, Michelle Muenzler, Corinne Duyvis, Therese Arkenberg, Ada Milenkovic Brown, Calvin D. Jim and Gabrijel Savic Ra.
Interview with Maurice Broaddus
Cover Art by Lisa Grabenstetter

The Quarterly is available from Amazon.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Kistur did stay. He slept below stairs, spending his days in the stable, coming in only for meals. He didn’t speak to Martin; just dealt with the horses, and helped Pia manage the boiler, which, as it developed, took some managing. “He says he stayed because you gave him shit about taking care of the horses,” Pia told Martin.

“I gave him shit. Not about the horses. Not half what he gave me.”

Pia was making berry cobbler. Martin was watching him and eating stray scraps of dough. He was drinking cider with the scraps, having found a great stone jug of cider on the floor of the pantry that morning which he had been working his steady way through since.

“Some of these North Country contracts have issues,” Pia confided comfortably, tamping down the edges of the cobbler crust.

“He can suck me,” Martin said. Pia glanced at him, and at the cider. Martin finished what was in the cup and poured more. It wasn’t the cider. He wished.

Chapter 13 of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website! We’re fast approaching the conclusion, which should be posted on March 22!

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

He and Deja had been back to Strauss Estate a half a dozen times over the years since they had gone up to Durbin, but they hadn’t stayed at the Estate House – when they came, it was to camp in the mountains, or to stay at the lodge at the lake. Deja’s rooms had been kept just as they had been left. Martin moved through the suite, unpacking their baggage, uncovering things he had forgotten he knew: a small yellow pillow filled with hulled rice Deja had liked, a painted bowl on the stand by the bed, the smooth honey-colored wood of the combs in Deja’s bath. The contract that had lived in these rooms seemed impossibly young to him.

After he unpacked, he braced himself and went downstairs.

The house was fancied up for Winter Holiday, with lead crystals on every light source, crystal beads spilling from the planters, elaborate lace hangings on the walls, and foil cutaways on every surface that might take them, not to mention sweetwood burning in fireplaces. The floors gleamed with polish, metal and glass shone bright. Even the contracts had new clothing. Wasn’t everything jolly.

Chapter 12 of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website!

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

We’re thrilled to announce that Ben Greene‘s brilliant art A Deafened Plea For Peace, which was featured on the cover of Crossed Genres’ Issue 21 (Invasion), has made the shortlist for the British Science Fiction Association‘s 2010 award for Best Art! Huge congratulations to Ben!

Here’s the official announcement.

“A Deafened Plea For Peace” was one of six pieces selected from the long-list of nominations (Partial long-list here). Also on the long-list for Best Art was Tânia Sousa Ribeiro’s piece Our Hell, which was the cover of Crossed Genres issue 17 (Antihero). RJ Astruc’s novel A Festival of Skeletons was on the long-list for Best Novel. Congrats to Tânia and RJ as well!

The winners will be announced the evening of Saturday, April 23rd, at a ceremony hosted at Eastercon. If you know any BSFA members, put in a good word for Ben! ;)

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Harper was working on a post for the Republic Society of Science page. The editors wanted revisions, which work had Harper in a furious, delighted, evil mood. And meanwhile, he had Martin doing most of his work.

Oh, he gave his lectures. But Martin built his boards, found his captures, took all his labs and tutorials; Martin evaluated student reports, fetched meals and took notes at meetings Harper couldn’t make; Martin traveled up the railway line to Paris or down to White Thorn, to some archive for a hardcopy Harper just had to have. It stretched Martin’s usual day up to fourteen hours, especially if he had work to finish.

This afternoon, he had taken the geology lab on deformation and cleavage in metamorphic rock. The students were hopeless. They spent the lab whispering to each other and peeking at Martin. He went from station to station, bringing up captures to show them how the links in their texts matched the rocks before them. None had done the reading beforehand; and their lab reports, which he spent the evening evaluating, had been abysmal. But this might have been because none of them could construct a simple sentence. Less time on the slam ball court, more time reading texts, that’s what Martin would advise. Shit, he had written better than this at ten, and he’d spent his childhood scrubbing loading docks.

Chapter 11 of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website! (A bit late – sorry about that!)

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Yesterday, The Portal posted a wonderful review of CG’s 2nd anthology, Crossed Genres Year Two.

The reviewer seems particularly impressed with Sabrina Vourvoulias’ “Flying With the Dead” from our Characters of Color issue:

I can’t begin to summarize in a way that does it justice, but it’s filled with the hope and bitterness and fear tied in the issue of illegal immigration, the common and not-so-common humanity of the people involved, and wrapped in a wonderful, winged ending. It doesn’t make the world any better, obviously, but it’s warmth in an otherwise cold place. It’s quite possibly the best place to end the anthology: with ghosts whispering promises.

The editors have clearly had a successful year.

Overall it’s an extremely positive review and we’re very, very pleased with it. So pleased, we spontaneously decided to offer Crossed Genres Year Two for 25% off as a “Thank you”!

The sale will last through Saturday, January 8. Thanks to all our supporters, and to The Portal for the review!

* Zipped bundle contains 7 DRM-free formats: EPUB, LIT, LRF, MOBI, PDB, PDF and PRC.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

The noise of the sea wind was enormous, like the roar of shuttle engines battering his ears. Sun burned the rock beneath him, burned his bare shoulders and back. It felt good. He felt good. For the first time in a long while, he felt safe, his knees against his chest, the stone beneath him, the day open before him. He had knocked a fragment of rock loose and was rubbing its edge with his thumb, squinting at it in the bright light, when Tsilla poked his ribs. “Yow, you’re skinnier than ever. Can’t you make him feed you?”

Martin jumped. He didn’t drop the rock, though. He looked around for his shirt and undershirt, spotted them in a heap on the rocks where he had left them and went to put them on. He rolled down the legs of his trousers while he was at it, and did up their laces. Tsilla scuffed at the sand drifting across the slab of pillow lava.

“You’re not supposed to be here,” he told her without rancor, buttoning his shirt. It’s not like Tsilla ever was where she was supposed to be, these days.

Chapter 10 of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website!

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Congratulations, Franklin Bonds! Your Fidelity Systems account has been updated! Please have your password ready and log into your page to verify the additions.

Franklin clicked on the link and entered his password on the splash page. He accessed his personal database, and when the page came up he quickly exhaled.

Instead of the expected list of his seven past lovers and the coinciding dates, times, location, and blank Excuse? boxes, he had thirteen. Six new additions, all within minutes of each other from the night before. He knew that his evening hadn’t included sex with six different men and women — he’d be in a lot worse shape if he had. At least, he hoped it hadn’t. Not now that he was engaged, anyway. Before, well, maybe. He would try anything once, but…

Science in My Fiction has posted its free fiction for December: “The Trouble With Chips” by C.B. Calsing. Calsing’s story “Mars-side” appeared in Crossed Genres issue 7 (“Urban”).

Enjoy this free fic!

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Over on the gazebo, the university orchestra screeched through some elaborate arrangement. Everyone said holder music was awful. Which it didn’t matter to Martin: holder or cot, all music made him ill. Shoulders hunched, he got out of range of the racket as quickly as possible.

Above, clouds puffed into immense blossoms in the bright spring air; here below, ribbons and new flags popped on every pinion and from every window. The green and blue flag of the Republic with its triple superimposed worlds snapped on the flagpole just above the green flag of Julian and the ornate silver and blue flag of the West Country. Martin never could sort out the symbols of the holders’ flags: ancient weapons and tools, various animals, strips of this color over bars of that, who knew what all it meant. Well, Deja – Deja knew what each bit meant, and would tell anyone fool enough to ask.

Down on the lower commons, Martin slipped past a crowd of holder children and their nannies laughing at a crew doing the one about the bears and the dogs, and headed over the footbridge toward the market booths. It was cakes cooking somewhere. He snuffed hungrily.

Chapter 9 of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website!

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Crossed Genres is proud to officially release RJ Astruc’s novel A Festival of Skeletons!

When Kamphor’s west end sees a series of prostitutes murdered, its citizens are fearful that a serial killer known as the Knife has returned. But the mortician Sink, owner of Kamphor’s finest morgue, doesn’t believe that the Knife has resumed killing – and he’d prove it, if his former student and current hateful rival Damien Torvault wasn’t getting in the way.

Sink and his two apprentices, handsome-if-loony Joshua Finkle and merkind Vona Urgarth, investigate the murders on their own. Sink’s ability to tell exactly when and how a person will die just by touching them earns him no friends, but it does yield some interesting clues – as does Sink’s other gift. The one which incites him to wear women’s clothing.

The investigation is further complicated when Joshua’s time is taken up running a 15-Step program, and Vona becomes intrigued by a repugnant yet strangely irresistible cook. Even Sink’s next-door neighbor, Policewoman Arifia Fowles, seems hell-bent on not just hindering Sink but arresting him, regardless of a crime.

But Sink presses urgently on, because he senses a strangeness in the air: the magic-smell of necromancy, a magic that has long been illegal in Kamphor… for it requires human sacrifice.


“If you have no interest at all in reading a fabulous, well thought-out, engaging story, stay away from RJ Astruc’s writing – you’ll get sucked in and read it anyway. The moment I started reading, she dragged me along for an extraordinary, outrageous ride through a perfectly ordinary universe filled with murder, madness, mystery, magic, merfolk, and morticians. Dark humor, light humor, macabre doings, cute little outfits, deluded cops, and afternoon tea with reformed alcoholics are all just the tip of the iceberg in this story. I’m not only reserving bookshelf space for the printed edition of A Festival of Skeletons, I’ll be reserving reading and re-reading time for it, too. Be careful of this one, readers; you won’t want to put it down, either!”
-Jean Johnson, New York Times Bestselling Author of the Sons of Destiny series

~

…like a love child of Terry Pratchett and Robert Rankin – a pacy, intelligent comedy novel that’s crazier than a cat on catnip … Highly recommended.”
SciFi & Fantasy Books

~

“The plot follows an even pace with plenty of surprises that are perfectly foreshadowed. I was kicking myself that I didn’t catch on to them earlier, but I was amazed at how wonderfully put-together this story is.
Only the Best Science Fiction & Fantasy

~

“R. J. Astruc is fortunate that I don’t know where she lives. Otherwise I would be besieging her domicile and demanding, with money and menaces, a sequel…”
Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand

.

You can read the first three chapters of A Festival of Skeletons for free!

A Festival of Skeletons is now available in several formats. Please consider picking up a copy of the novel reviewers have called “…a must-read. It’s a cruel, humorous page-turner for the wicked at heart.

.

TITLE: A Festival of Skeletons
Author: RJ Astruc
Publisher: Crossed Genres
Pages: 175
ISBN-13: 978-1453757352
ISBN-10: 145375735X
Release date: December 1, 2010
Edited by Kay T. Holt
Cover Art by Jonatan Iversen-Ejve
Design & layout by Bart R. Leib

* Zipped bundle contains 7 DRM-free formats: EPUB, LIT, LRF, MOBI, PDB, PDF and PRC.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Yes, indeed! It is a time to celebrate. Issue 25 is live! Not only are we celebrating five outstanding stories and a beautiful illustration, but we’re also celebrating our first issue together as editors (that’s me, Natania Barron, and Jaym Gates, in case you missed it). This issue travels across the water, the desert, and into space; it recalls songs of celebration and festivals of renewal. And it’s all free for your perusal.

If you’re still a fan of print issues, don’t fret! We’re going to be offering beautiful, quarterly versions with bonus added material.

As we get our space legs out here in the Crossed Genres universe, prepare to hear lots more from your new editors. Our next issue, Opposites, is shaping up to be quite fabulous, and we’ve got lots of delicious surprises in store in the coming year. Ooh, shiny!

Without further ado, here’s what you’ll find in the marvelous Celebration issue:

ARTWORK

“Balloons” by Margaret Hardy</td>

FICTION
We Shall Overcome
by Nicole Givens Kurtz

The Gift
by Christie Yant

Lunar Year’s End
by Jaymee Goh

Total Security
by Arthur Carey

Desert Tango
by Jacob Edwards

</td> </tr> </table>

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

The next day he was in the archives, working his way through an expense log kept by an in-system freighter that had hauled, among other things, contract miners among the asteroid mines, when he heard Fen at the gate.

Fen had no legitimate right to access. To enter the archives, you had to be trained in handling ancient documents. Fen had training in packing code and security protocols and ecological engineering, and, for all Martin knew, a dozen other exciting issues, but he had, Martin would have bet his back teeth, no training in handling archived documents, ancient or otherwise.

Nevertheless, here he came, busting through the gate, yanking off his big hairy coat as he entered the clean room, stomping straight for Martin’s table. Past him, Martin saw the curator scrambling through his own gate. Coming to his feet, Martin slipped on his static gloves and got the logbook shut and sealed in its case before Fen reached him.

The second half of Chapter 8 of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website! (It’s such a long chapter we had to split it in two!)

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Chapter 8 (the first half) of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website! (It’s such a long chapter we had to split it in two!)

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

(This was originally posted at Bart Leib’s blog.)

Some of you may have seen my recent post calling for reviewers. I was being secretive about why, but this morning I realized that there’s really no reason to. I’m just in the habit from Crossed Genres, I guess. ;)

So I’m pleased to announce that I will soon be launching Rise Reviews, a site dedicated to reviewing quality speculative fiction that did not receive professional pay*.

This is something that I’ve been thinking about for a long time. See, most review sites either only review fiction from professional-paying markets, or take most of what they review from those markets. I don’t hold that against them – every review site receives FAR more review requests than it could possibly accomplish, and each one has to decide for itself how to narrow down the pile.

But the result is that, more often than not, smaller presses which don’t pay pro rates are the ones that get passed over. And that’s what Rise Reviews will cover. Many of these publishers produce excellent quality publications, and I hope that Rise will be able to help bring new writers and smaller presses to the attention of readers. Rise Reviews will hopefully provide a complement to other review sites.

I’ve already got a solid core of reviewers, and the website is being developed. I’m aiming for a launch date of January 1. Rise Reviews will not be directly affiliated with Crossed Genres – the only real connection will be that I’m the owner/operator of the former and the publisher of the latter.

Right now, I could use 2 things:

  • If you are a publisher, editor, author or agent who has a novel, anthology/collection or magazine that you would like reviewed (which fits the criteria**), please email reviews@crossedgenres.com. (We can’t review everything of course, but we’ll see what we can do.) Please put “Review request” in the subject line of the email. We’re open to reviewing just about any type of speculative fiction (including erotica, crossover, etc.), of pretty much any length**.
  • If you have review experience and would like to contribute to Rise Reviews, also please email reviews@crossedgenres.com. Please put “Reviewing for RR” in the subject line of the email. Describe your experience, and if you can, include a link to a review you wrote. The more reviewers we have, the more fiction we can cover!

Many thanks to everyone who’s shown interest and contributed in various ways so far! I’m really looking forward to the launch!

___________________________________

* “Professional rates” in this case is defined according to SFWA’s criteria: $0.05/word for short fiction, $2000 for novels.

** Rise Reviews will only review work that received some form of monetary compensation – at least a token payment, but less than professional rates. That means no self-published work and no publications which pay only in copies.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Time for an impromptu giveaway. Let’s make it a good one!

- – - - – -

- A print ARC of RJ Astruc’s novel A Festival of Skeletons
- A print copy of our second anthology, Crossed Genres Year Two
- A print copy of our first anthology, Crossed Genres Year One
- 5 postcards with the cover art for A Festival of Skeletons

What a package! All can be yours free! All you have to do is post to your site or blog about my call for genre fiction reviewers, with a link to the original post. A tweet counts, too. Both is better! (but doesn’t double your chances of winning, sorry!)

When you’ve posted and/or tweeted, email a link to your post/tweet to reviews-at-crossedgenres-dot-com. That’s it! Noon tomorrow I’ll randomly select someone for the package.

Let’s see those posts and tweets! Open to U.S. and international – all welcome!

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Bart Leib, co-publisher of Crossed Genres, is seeking people with experience reviewing genre fiction. This developing project isn’t directly associated with CG, but we’re passing it along anyway.

For more info please read the original post.

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Chapter 7 of Kelly Jennings’ novel Broken Slate is now on the website!

This tense, invigorating novel shows the origin of Martin Eduardo, a “contract” who must battle not only societal discrimination and oppression, but also the indoctrinated restrictions within his own heart and mind. Broken Slate is being serialized online for free. It updates every other Tuesday.

Go here to read it! Or you can start at the beginning.

Read a short story about Martin Eduardo, published in issue 13 of Crossed Genres: Lunch Money

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

It’s been a little more than two years since crossedgenres.com went public and we started accepting submissions. We had no idea what we were doing and the learning curve was steep, but somehow, we didn’t screw up enough and now find ourselves here.

As of this issue, we’ve published 137 stories from 118 authors; 41 works of art from 30 artists; 19 articles; and 13 interviews.

Publishing a magazine is a marathon, especially the way we do it: Accept submissions one month, do all the work the following month, and release the issue on the 1st of the next month. Had we realized that Crossed Genres was by its very nature destined for such a fast-paced turnaround… well, we’d probably have done it anyway, because anything else wouldn’t be Crossed Genres.

When CG was first conceived, we never envisioned anything more. We didn’t think that we’d be publishing novels, or running a science blog, or hosting contests, or even putting out yearly anthologies. We thought the magazine would be more than enough – heck, we didn’t really even think past reaching the end of the first year. Lost of zines close after just an issue or two, and we were only focused on not being one of those.

CG has been far more than just the work that went into it, or the resulting publications. We’ve met some of our best friends through this work. Our wonderful Associate Editor Kelly Jennings, and the magazine’s new editors Jaym Gates and Natania Barron, were all published in our issues well before they became part of CG. Despite all the work and struggles, controversies, and loss of money (yes, still), This has been one of the most rewarding things we have ever done. The pleasure – the privilege – of finding out we’d selected a story to print from a previously unpublished author will stay with us forever, and we’re proud of how often that’s happened.

Handing over the reins of the magazine is difficult, but it’s tempered by the knowledge that we’re freeing ourselves up to make the whole of CG bigger, better, more badass. Rather than being sad, we’re immensely grateful to have the opportunity to create something and then send it out to endure beyond our governance.

To everyone who has supported Crossed Genres these first two years, thank you. Next year will be even better.

Best,

Bart & Kay
Crossed Genres Editors (12/2008 to 11/2010)

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Crossed Genres is proud to announce the release of our 24th issue! Theme: Characters of Color

ARTWORK:
Cover: “Long Walk” by Wilson Williams Jr.
Inside: “Regal” by Grace D. Palmer

FICTION:
Flying With the Dead by Sabrina Vourvoulias
Protected Entity by Daniel José Older
Drag Queen Astronaut by Sandra McDonald
Presence by Barbara Ann Wright
Sy Nebula and the Dream Tosser by Angela Ambroz
Equatorial Snow by Faslishah Johanabas
Blood Oranges by Audrey Fine
Dangerous Terrain by Kelly Jennings
December by Teresa Jusino
In the Half Light, a Woman by Lavanya Karthik
Diaspora by Paul Lamb

INTERVIEWS:
Author Tobias Buckell Interview by Kay T. Holt
Writer/Director Alex Rivera Interview by Kay T. Holt

We’re immensely pleased to be able to deliver a special end-of-year issue of such quality. Characters of Color are underrepresented in speculative fiction. We knew a year ago, when we were releasing our LGBTQ issue, that this would be the theme for our second special issue.

Please enjoy the issue for free on the website, and let us – and the contributors – know what you think. Leave a comment or two telling the contributors you appreciate their work. Tell people about the issue: help us show that there’s plenty of room for more Characters of Color in SFF- not just in themed issues but all the time!

And help us to continue producing this work: please purchase this issue (print & ebook) to support Crossed Genres!

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

crossedgenres: (Default)
[personal profile] simf

Crossed Genres is proud to announce the release of our 24th issue! Theme: Characters of Color

ARTWORK:
Cover: “Long Walk” by Wilson Williams Jr.
Inside: “Regal” by Grace D. Palmer

FICTION:
Flying With the Dead by Sabrina Vourvoulias
Protected Entity by Daniel José Older
Drag Queen Astronaut by Sandra McDonald
Presence by Barbara Ann Wright
Sy Nebula and the Dream Tosser by Angela Ambroz
Equatorial Snow by Faslishah Johanabas
Blood Oranges by Audrey Fine
Dangerous Terrain by Kelly Jennings
December by Teresa Jusino
In the Half Light, a Woman by Lavanya Karthik
Diaspora by Paul Lamb

INTERVIEWS:
Author Tobias Buckell Interview by Kay T. Holt
Writer/Director Alex Rivera Interview by Kay T. Holt

We’re immensely pleased to be able to deliver a special end-of-year issue of such quality. Characters of Color are underrepresented in speculative fiction. We knew a year ago, when we were releasing our LGBTQ issue, that this would be the theme for our second special issue.

Please enjoy the issue for free on the website, and let us – and the contributors – know what you think. Leave a comment or two telling the contributors you appreciate their work. Tell people about the issue: help us show that there’s plenty of room for more Characters of Color in SFF- not just in themed issues but all the time!

And help us to continue producing this work: please purchase this issue (print & ebook) to support Crossed Genres!

Mirrored from Crossed Genres.

Profile

crossedgenres: (Default)
Crossed Genres

October 2011

S M T W T F S
       1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags